Assist for Putin wanes in his former Russian stronghold


FILE - In this March 6, 2018, file photo, Russian President Vladimir Putin listens to employees of Uralvagonzavod factory in Nizhny Tagil, Russia. In 2011, Nizhny Tagil - an industrial city some 1,400 kilometers (870 miles) east of Moscow - was nicknamed “Putingrad” for its residents' fervent support of the president. Now, however, workers who once defended Putin are speaking out against the constitutional reforms that would allow him to stay in office until 2036.

FILE – On this March 6, 2018, file picture, Russian President Vladimir Putin listens to workers of Uralvagonzavod manufacturing facility in Nizhny Tagil, Russia. In 2011, Nizhny Tagil – an industrial metropolis some 1,400 kilometers (870 miles) east of Moscow – was nicknamed “Putingrad” for its residents’ fervent assist of the president. Now, nevertheless, employees who as soon as defended Putin are talking out towards the constitutional reforms that might permit him to remain in workplace till 2036.

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AP

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In 2011, the commercial metropolis of Nizhny Tagil was dubbed “Putingrad” for its residents’ fervent assist for Russian President Vladimir Putin.

9 years later, it seems town 1,400 kilometers (870 miles) east of Moscow now not lives as much as that nickname.

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Employees are talking out towards the constitutional modifications that might permit Putin to remain in workplace till 2036 amid rising frustration over their dire dwelling circumstances, which haven’t improved regardless of all the guarantees.

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“I’m towards the constitutional modifications, most significantly as a result of they’re a coronation of the czar, who reigns however doesn’t rule — Vladimir Vladimirovich Putin,” says Nikolay Nemytov, a 43-year-old engineer at Russian Railways, a state-run monopoly. He says his month-to-month wage, the equal of $430, isn’t practically sufficient.

Anton Zhuravlyov, a 33-year-old operator on the Nizhny Tagil Iron and Metal Works Plant, or NTMK, agrees with him on the vote.

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“I believe (the vote) is only a present. It’s extra for Putin to indicate that, ‘Look, the folks assist me, I’m nonetheless wanted, I’m in demand,’” stated Zhuravlyov, whose employer is likely one of the two largest corporations within the metropolis. He says his wage hasn’t modified in 4 years, including: “Nearly all of persons are towards him.”

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Commentators say dwindling public assist is the explanation why the Kremlin rushed to push via the modifications that successfully would permit Putin, already in energy for twenty years, to carry workplace for an additional 16 years if he chooses.

The coronavirus outbreak pressured officers to postpone an April 22 vote on a set of structure amendments that included a clause that resets the time period rely for Putin, permitting him to run for 2 extra six-year phrases after his present time period ends in 2024.

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On the first signal of the outbreak slowing down, Putin rescheduled the plebiscite for Wednesday, though Russia’s each day variety of new infections continues to be slightly below 7,000. His traditionally excessive approval ranking is at an all-time low — 59% in Could, based on Levada Middle, Russia’s prime unbiased pollster — and the Kremlin is clearly struggling to rally the keenness and the turnout wanted for the vote to be seen as a nationwide triumph.

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Financial woes, like these in Nizhny Tagil, have been eroding Putin’s rankings for years, stated Denis Volkov, a sociologist with the Levada Middle.

“Over the previous 5 years, poverty has been repeatedly rising, folks’s monetary scenario was worsening, and within the midst of it, the (approval) rankings have been slowly declining,” he stated.

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The temper was far totally different in 2011-12, when Nizhny Tagil, with its 360,000 residents, turned a bedrock of assist for Putin.

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Igor Kholmanskih, a foreman on the state tank and railroad automotive manufacturing facility Uralvagonzavod, appeared on Putin’s annual nationwide phone-in marathon in December 2011 and denounced the mass protests occurring in Moscow on the time as a menace to “stability.”

“At present, our workers of many hundreds has work, has salaries, has a future, and we worth this stability very a lot. We don’t need to return,” the foreman stated in proposing that he “and the fellows” journey to Moscow to assist suppress the unrest.

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“Do come over!” Putin stated with a smile. A number of days after his inauguration in Could 2012, the president visited Nizhny Tagil. Per week later, he appointed Kholmanskikh to be his envoy within the Ural mountains area.

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In a stark distinction, the once-vehement Putin supporter later criticized authorities for embellishing statistics on salaries that did not replicate the dire dwelling circumstances. Kholmanskikh’s unremarkable political profession resulted in June 2018 when Putin dismissed him, and he returned to Uralvagonzavod as chairman of the board — solely to step down and fully vanish from public view by January of this yr.

“The bulk does not see this sort of cash of their wallets. When folks hear about common salaries of their cities and areas, they simply assume they’re being lied to,” Kholmanskikh stated in a uncommon public look at a convention in December.

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His sentiment tracked the shifting temper of Nizhny Tagil residents, from assist to opposition, after a number of years of falling dwelling requirements.

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“Certainly, we was once ‘Putingrad.’ We used to assist the federal government’s agenda,” says Nadezhda Zhuravlyova, 36, an area activist. “Loads has modified. The agenda that the federal government is selling now not satisfies native residents’ wants.”

Zhuravlyova, who labored at NTMK for seven years and is now on maternity depart, is the face of an area opposition motion, Tagil for Modifications, that was based in 2018 — the yr of the election that gave Putin one other six years.

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She says protests have been rising since then, with folks now not afraid to take a public stand.

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“In March, we organized a mass picket towards the constitutional amendments, and plenty of metropolis residents (who attended) we weren’t acquainted with — they weren’t simply from our circle. Folks simply noticed the protest and got here ahead,” Zhuravlyova says.

Zhuravlyova blames unpopular authorities insurance policies corresponding to elevating the retirement age and rising tariffs on rubbish assortment. She says wages are rising slowly however dwelling circumstances are worsening.

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“Many individuals get their wage and instantly spend it — (on) utility payments, paying off loans … schooling, well being care, groceries and drugs,” Zhuravlyova stated.

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Nemytov, who labored at NTMK for 12 years earlier than becoming a member of Russian Railways, says he spends virtually half of his $430 wage on utility payments that go up yearly.

“That is simply not sufficient for my household,” stated the engineer, who provides that he can’t take his 4 youngsters on enjoyable outings or on holidays to southern Russia.

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Zhuravlyov echoes his sentiment, blaming Putin.

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“He is a very powerful boss. (Folks) do as he says,” the employee says.

Nemytov believes the constitutional modifications will not enhance life for employees in Nizhny Tagil.

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“They solely look after us as numbers on a chunk of paper. We do not exist for them,” the engineer says.

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Litvinova reported from Moscow.

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