Which kings are buried at Westminster Abbey? – Royal Central


Based in 960, Westminster Abbey, or the Collegiate Church of Saint Peter at Westminster, is a primarily Gothic abbey church within the metropolis of Westminster, London. Close to the Thames and the Palace of Westminster, it is without doubt one of the United Kingdom’s most notable and recognizable non secular buildings.

A standard place of coronation and burials for English monarchs, it has been the setting for among the most well-known royal occasions in historical past. Royal Central is looking on the kings buried on the Abbey.

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Sebert, King of the East Saxons and Ethelgoda

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Buried within the south ambulatory of the Abbey is Sebert (or Sebbe) King of the East Saxons, who died round AD 616. Throughout this era, the East Saxons space consisted of what’s now Essex, Middlesex, and a part of Hertfordshire. Sebert’s dad and mom have been Sledd and Ricula (the sister of King Ethelbert of Kent.) Sebert’s spouse Ethelgoda who died round 615 is alleged to be buried with him.

Edward the Confessor

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Reigning from 1042 to 1066, Edward was one of many final Anglo-Saxon kings of England. After his demise in January 1066, Edward’s burial procession went from Westminster Corridor to the Abbey. Buried on the sixth, the Feast of the Epiphany earlier than the Excessive Altar, a reliquary of gold and silver was made for Edward’s stays.

Henry III of England

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Henry III was one of many longest-reigning monarchs in English historical past and was identified for his devotion to Edward the Confessor. He succeeded his father in 1216 and set about remodelling Westminster Abbey. He served till his demise in November 1272.

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Initially buried within the outdated grave of Edward the Confessor, Henry is the primary monarch to be buried in a coffin (fairly than having the physique be seen with a wax effigy). 19 years after his demise, he was put by his son Edward I to the north of the Shrine of St Edward at Westminster.

Edward I of England

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The son of Henry III of England, Edward reigned from 1272 to 1307, and was named in honour of Edward the Confessor. After his July demise at Burgh on the Sands in Cumberland the place his physique was embalmed, he was taken to Waltham Abbey in Essex. In October of 1307, he was dropped at Westminster for burial on the chapel of St Edward the Confessor.

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Edward III of England

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Edward, also referred to as Edward of Windsor earlier than his accession, reigned from 1327 to 1377. Typically famous for his army success, Edward can also be identified for restoring royal authority after the turbulent reign of his unpopular father, Edward II. Edward was buried close to his spouse’s monument within the chapel of St Edward the Confessor.

Richard II of England

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Reigning from June 1377 to September 1399, Richard died round February 1400 at Pontefract Fortress, most probably due to hunger. Richard inherited the throne as a boy however as he gained maturity, his rule turned more and more unpopular. In 1387, management of the federal government was taken over by a gaggle of noblemen referred to as the Lords Appellant. By 1389, Richard gained management as soon as once more. However In 1399, after Richar’s uncle John of Gaunt died, the king disinherited Gaunt’s son, Henry of Bolingbroke. Whereas Richard was in Eire, Henry returned to say his father’s inheritance. He then captured and deposed Richard and was topped King Henry IV.

Richard was initially buried in King’s Langley Priory in Hertfordshire. In 1413, Henry V moved the physique to its closing resting place at Westminster Abbey.

Henry V of England

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Reigning from 1413 to 1422, Henry V is thought for his army success within the Hundred Years’ Struggle in opposition to France and for making England one of many strongest army powers in Europe. Earlier than his demise, in August 1422, he had negotiated the Treaty of Troyes which made him and his successors heirs to the French throne. Henry was initially embalmed in Rouen Cathedral in Normandy, France. His physique was then moved to the Abbey in November 1422.

Henry VII of England

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Reigning 1485 to 1509, Henry VII was the primary monarch of the Home of Tudor. Henry died of tuberculosis at Richmond Palace in April 1509. He was buried subsequent to his spouse, Elizabeth of York, within the chapel he had commissioned within the Abbey.

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Edward VI of England

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Reigning 1547 to 1553, Edward was topped on 20 February when he was solely 9 years outdated. The son of Henry VIII and Jane Seymour, Edward was England’s first monarch to be raised as a Protestant.

James VI and I

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Often known as James VI King of Scotland from 1567, James turned King of England and Eire as James I in 1603 after the union of the Scottish and English crowns. The son of Mary, Queen of Scots, and a great-great-grandson of Henry VII, King of England and Lord of Eire, James died in 1625 after struggling a stroke.

Charles II of England

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King of Scotland from 1649 to 1651, Charles was King of Scotland, England, and Eire from the 1660 Restoration till his demise in 1685.

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William III of England

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William was Sovereign Prince of Orange from beginning and in 1688, performed a central half within the ‘Superb Revolution’ which unseated his father-in-law, James II. William, alongside his spouse, Mary, turned joint sovereign of England, Scotland and Eire. William died of pneumonia in 1702.

George II of Nice Britain

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George was King of Nice Britain and Eire, Duke of Brunswick -Lüneburg (Hanover), and a prince-elector of the Holy Roman Empire from June 1727 till his demise in 1760.

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